INTERACT 2017 in Mumbai – Part 2

As I wrote in the previous post, I recently had the opportunity to attend and present at INTERACT which took place in Mumbai, India. In this post, I write about two posters & demos. The Poster and demos sessions took place in every coffee / tea break during the whole conference, giving the attendees plenty of opportunitities to visit the individiual demo booths.

HeartHab

Supraja Sankaram presenting her HeartHab application

Supraja Sankaran (Hasselt University, Belgium) demonstrated a tool to personalize e-coaching based on individual patient risk factors, adherence rates and personal preferences of patients using a tele-rehabilitation solution. In their abstract, she and her co-authors Mieke Haesen, Paul Dendale, Kris Luyten and Karin Coninx describe, that they

developed the tool after conducting a workshop and multiple brainstorms with various caregivers involved in coaching cardiac patients to connect their perspectives with patient needs. It was integrated into a comprehensive tele-rehabilitation application.

Supraja was one of the participants in our EIT Health / ACM SIGCHI eHealth summer school (see here, or here), so it was really nice meeting her again at the conference. Supraja was born in India, and she went out of her way helping us Non-Indians, for instance explaining the food or local practices to me. It was really fun!

Mind the Gap

Another extremely interesting demo was the game “Mind the Gap – A Playful Take on Gender Imbalance in ICT” by Max Willis and Antonella De Angeli (University of Trento). I had met Antonella already on Monday during the field trip and she introduced me to Max (her PhD student) during lunch. Thus, we already talked briefly about the game and I couldn’t wait to play it. They outlined the aim on their poster:

Mind the Gap is a provocative, playful intervention and a research tool that illuminates players’ attitudes and experiences concerning gender privilege and discrimination in ICT. It initiates a structured social interaction around gender issues driven by role-play and participant authored texts.

The gameboard charts a typical technology carreer path. Female Player Characters (PC’s) roll a 4-sided die, male PC’s roll a 6-sided die. Players advance and draw a ‘privilege’ card describing a scenario which is scored to reflect a penalty or an advanage according to the gender of the PC.

During the game, players an author their own privilege cards, add decisions, or create new rules and add them to the game.

Playing this game was really fascinating, but also reading the cards authored by previous players. It didn’t take long for me to pick the card which you see in the picture below: “Congrats! You will have a baby!” As my character was female like me (the character is drawn at the beginning of the game), I had to leave the career path and go on the family path.

“Mind the Gap”  by Max Willis and Antonella De Angeli

Later I drew the card “Change gender to female, if you are men”. Too bad – I might have wanted my character to change to male in that case 🙂 The game drew a lot of attention and it was really interesting. I am really looking forward to reading more about their findings in the future. For more information, visit their project website.

At the end of the conference, the organisers showed us the following clip they put together, which I think is really nice:

INTERACT 2017 in Mumbai – Part 1

This year’s INTERACT conference took place in Mumbai, India. It started off with field trips and workshops on Monday and Tuesday. The main conference was held from 27-29. September. The conference was extremely well organised and I am very glad that I could attend, listen to interesting talks, present our own paper, and meet so many kind and open people who do extremely interesting research.

What is INTERACT?

INTERACT is a biennial conference and is organised by the Technical Committee on Human–Computer Interaction (IFIP TC13) of the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP). IFIP is a non-governmental umbrella organisation of national societies working in the field of Information technology. IFIP is organised through technical commitees; TC13 is the committee on Human-Computer Interaction and consists of serveral working groups. This year’s INTERACT conference was the 16th conference; the previous one took place 2015 in Bamberg (Germany). INTERACT in Bamberg was my first international conference, where I  presented a paper on the use of online reviews in the design process and how they can help designers to take the perspective of the people they are designing for.

Field Trip

This year was the first time, that researchers could propose field trips. As the deadline for registrating one’s interest was before I was notified that our short paper was accepted, I thought that participation was not possible any more. However, Arne Berger, the organiser of one field trip saw on Twitter, that I was attending the conference and asked whether I was interested in joining one day, as there was still a free spot. Excellent opportunity indeed! The field trip Understanding The Informal Support Networks Of Older Adults in India aimed to get a nuanced view on older adults’ practices of receiving from and providing support to peers, family, friends, and neighbors. It was a two-day fieldtrip, however, I only attended on Monday. Here we were split into two groups and I was forming a group together with Dhaval Vyas (Queensland University of Technology) and Antonella De Angeli (University of Trento). We conducted two interviews during the day. The couple we interviewed first felt more comfortable speaking in Hindi, so Dhaval interviewed them, and every now and then translated his question and/or their answers in English. That was a really interesting experience and Dhaval did a great job also including us, when he translated every now and then, what was said. Of course, this was not always possible, as this would have disturbed the flow of the conversation. Something I noticed was that the idea of “older people receiving support” was challenged: This couple was not receiving support from their family in that sense. Instead, they were providing tremendous support for their children, because they took care of the grandkids.

The second interview took place in the afternoon, where we met a 85 year old woman, who had worked as a teacher until she was 80 years old. She felt comfortable speaking English, so all of us could ask her questions. I found her to be very inspiring and positive; it was a great pleasure talking to her and learning how she goes about her day. For example, she likes playing chess on the iPad and, according to her son, her memory improved since she does this. Every evening, she meets a couple of her female friends outside the house, where they all sit on the bench, enjoy each other’s company, and watch the grandkids play. We were invited to join her when she was meeting her friends right after the interview, which was really nice, too.

Indian women on the bench in front of their house with Arne Berger (TU Chemnitz)

Presenting our Paper on “Critical Incidents as Workshop Format”

I also was able to present our short paper on “Using Critical Incidents in Workshops to Inform eHealth Design”. This paper is based on the workshop we organised at NordiCHI 2016 and was written together with some of the organisers and participants. Practitioners, researchers and patients were invited to contribute with a critical incident related to eHealth services for patients and relatives. We accepted five critical incidents, of which three focussed on the patient perspective and two on the developer’s perspective. You can find the critical incidents submitted and analysed in the workshop here.

Christiane Grünloh presenting at INTERACT 2017

In the paper, we reflect on Critical Incidents as a format, which we made use of in our workshop. In sum, the participants and we as organisers found it very helpful to reflect together in a group on eHealth projects. Even though the format was quite unusual and some participants reported, that they struggled to follow our instructions related to the critical incidents, it also helped to re-examine and re-frame their particular project. I really enjoyed presenting this at INTERACT on behalf of my co-authors. I have to admit, that the time constraint of 8 minutes was quite tough. But our session chair Jacki O’Neill did a wonderful job creating a positive atmosphere while keeping the time.

In part 2, I will write about the poster & demo session.

Grand Opening of Uppsala University’s School of Technology (UppTech)

Last week Uppsala University’s new technological initiative Uppsala University School of Technology (UppTech) was opened. UppTEch will be a centre for technical competence that is now spread over several departments. The aim is to create a meeting point for coordination, discussion and joint problems for applications with a technical focus.

During the opening there were presentations from industry and research. Maria Strömme opened up with a very inspiring talk about the future, and some of the challenges that are ahead. She said that one of the challenges is the ageing population, and the number of people that are 60 or older will be as  much as 40% of the population. She also said that we have reached the peak of the number of children in the world, and most probably we will meet lots of adults if we walk the streets of cities in the year 2050.

A nice dinner was served after the grand opening, and Gunilla Myreteg, Åsa Cajander and Jonas Moll had a nice evening talking to different people interested in technology and its applications both from industry and the university.

 

Recommended Course for Master Students, Doctoral Students and Postdoctoral Reserachers

 

In April next year the NordWit Centre for Excellence will organize a course for master students, doctoral students and postdoctoral researchers in the area of gender work and transforming organisations. Several of the HTO people are going to this course, and we are also a part of the centre.

The course has a strong focus on participants’ own experiences and we are invited to bring our own studies into discussions.

 We think this sounds like a brilliant and very interesting course! So join us in Tambere on the 18th -20th of April 2018.

For more info see:

RESEARCHING GENDER, WORK AND TRANSFORMING ORGANIZATIONS: Methodologies, theories and practices

 

 

Nordiwt-logo-1

 

 

On Nailing and Thomas Lind’s PhD Dissertation

Three weeks ago Thomas Lind nailed his PhD thesis onto the log of a birch tree at the department. Nailing the printed thesis is the first step towards getting it accepted and earning a Doctor of Philosophy degree at Uppsala University. The nailing is also done electronically, and in this Digital world that might be more official than the actual book.  The idea with nailing a thesis is to make it openly available for anyone interested to read and review. It is seen as a step to ensure quality, and a PhD thesis needs to be nailed three weeks before the actual defense.

Yesterday three weeks had passed and we had invited a committee consisting of three well-known researchers within HCI to evaluate Thomas Lind’s work. The committee consisted of

A PhD dissertation starts off by the opponent giving a summary of the thesis placing it in the context of the research area. Professor Netta Iivari from University of Oulu did a splendid job in presenting Thomas Lind’s work.

After this presentation, the opponent has a discussion with the PhD student around the work done. Usually the discussion includes explaining concepts, the Methods used and paths taken. This discussion is followed by questions from the committee and from the audience. When the committee and audience has asked all their questions it is time for the grading committee to have a meeting to discuss the quality of the work.

Thomas has addressed a very pressing issue when implementing new IT in organisations and explores the concept of inertia in sociotechnical systems. His thesis is a contribution to understanding Systems development and change. The presentation and discussion during the dissertation was really interesting, and I especially appreciated the discussion around research communities, and what research community we want to impress.

All people involved did a very good job, and Thomas Lind not only nailed the thesis three weeks ago – he also nailed the dissertation discussion!

 

 

EIT Health/ACM SIGCHI eHealth Summer School 2017, week 2 in Stockholm and Uppsala

It was great to see everyone again at the second week of the EIT/SIGCHI summer school! It was now already three weeks ago, and I thought I should write a short blog post. The week started at the visualization studio at The Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Stockholm. We had all prepared a Pecha Kucha – a two minutes presentation about ourselves. It was great to hear about everyone’s research! The afternoon was focused on action research, with discussions about the pros and cons and presentations by Bengt Sandblad from Uppsala University, and the organizers of the second summer school week Jan Gulliksen from KTH and Åsa Cajander from Uppsala University (and the HTO group).

The second day all participants travelled to Uppsala, and the lectures took place in Gustavianum which is the oldest building of Uppsala University. The themes of the day were medical records online and a new surgical planning system implemented at the University Hospital in Uppsala. The lectures were held by Benny Eklund, IT strategist at Uppsala county council, Birgitta Wallgren who is a manager at Uppsala University Hospital, and Gunnar Enlund, chief physician at Uppsala University Hospital. My colleagues Christiane Grünloh, Åsa Cajander, and Jonas Moll also presented results from their studies regarding medical records online!

Wednesday we were back in Stockholm and had a workshop most of the day. We started with trying out different technologies such as VR glasses and tabletop computers. After lunch we had a teamwork exercise where we all developed a computer game together. My group’s task was to create the game sounds and we had a lot of fun doing so, even if we discovered some mistakes when our work was integrated with the rest of the game.

Thursday and Friday we had lectures and also groupwork! It was a great week with many interesting lectures. Read more details about the week in Jonas blog; Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, Day 4, Day 5!

HCI Seminars in Connection to Thomas Lind’s PhD Defence

Thomas Lind will defend his PhD thesis the 15th of September at 13.15 in 2446. You can read about the thesis in the previous HTO group’s blog post

In the morning before the PhD thesis defence the committee members and the opponent will give seminars. The seminars are open to anyone who is interested. 

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Seminars 

8.15-8.55. Netta Iivari will give a seminar on “Participatory Design and Technology Making with Children”

8.55-9.35. Olle Bälter will give a seminar on “Open Learning Initiative in Stanford’s  Digitalized University Courses”

9.35-9.50 Coffee break 

9.50-10.30. José Abdelnour Nocera will give a seminar related to HCI Education. 

10.30-11.10. Tone Bratteteig will give a seminar on “Research Methods when Design is Part of the Research” 

The seminars will be held in Fakultetsrummet at Ångströmslaboratoriet. 

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Please fill in the doodle so that we know how many to order coffee for. 

If you have any special dietary requests for the coffee break please add that as a comment in the doodle

– Please spread the word to anyone who might be interested in attending. 

Welcome! 

The HTO group