A Seminar (in Swedish) on the Implementation of IT in Healthcare

Back in December I was invited to give a seminar in Swedish at the EPJ department of Region Uppsala, the department in charge of many of the health-related IT systems used at the hospitals and primary care facilities in the region. My seminar was on the the current state of research in relation to how to implement IT in healthcare. Out of all the perspectives one can use to approach this area of challenges for healthcare, I devoted most of the seminar to presenting barriers and enablers to change management projects as well as IT development projects, and discussing these with the participants. The seminar was recorded and is now available on YouTube, if you find the topic interesting (and are comfortable with the Swedish language).

The HTO group, and more generally the HCI group at the Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University, have an ongoing collaboration with the EPJ department at the region, and there will be more seminars on a variety of topics given by us during the spring.

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

It’s time to charge your batteries and spend some time with family and friends. It is important to rest during holidays, especially if your work has been stressful. Far too many in academia burn out, or end up with depressions or other stress related problems.

Tip of the day: Last week there was a stress test released by SuntArbetsliv that I strongly recommend as it is based on the latest stress research:

https://www.suntarbetsliv.se/artiklar/organisatorisk-och-social-arbetsmiljo/se-stressen-tid-testa-dig-sjalv/

(Unfortunately in Swedish. I hope Google Translate will work)

We really hope that you take some time off, and that we wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy new year!

 

HTO Researchers Interviewed

Bengt Sandbad, Gerolf Nauwerk and Åsa Cajander were interviewed for a special issue on digital work environment, and our research is presented in two different articles in the magazine “Användbart!”.

The first article is about cognitive work environment work, and the history of the research area. It has the following introduction:

When you need your computer the most of them fail you. A sudden update interrupts your job. A crash erases the whole the morning’s work. Perhaps you can you recognize the stress when you made a mistake like that cannot be undone? Researcher Bengt Sandblad mean the way most IT systems are built is in conflict with how we humans work. Then cognitive work environment problems will occur.

The second article is about the digital work environment in health care and research on medical records online for patients. It also describes the DISA project.

Bad IT systems are a contributing factor to stress among healthcare employees according to the researcher Åsa Cajander, who examining a nurse’s digital work environment.

Tidningen Användbarhet 2.png

 

 

Read the full articles here (pp 3)! 

Would you like to do your Master Thesis with the HTO Group?

We are always interested in working together with master students that are interested in our area of expertise. Have a look at our research projects presented in this blog, or read about them in the project page. Looks interesting?  Then contact us to know more.

We are especially interested in students who would like to look into Scrum and how to incorporate users, digital work environment studies, eHealth and studies related to medical records online.

PhD Thesis: The Importance of eHealth Innovations: Lessons about Patient Accessible Information

Sofie Wass successfully defended her PhD thesis last week at Jönköping University, and I was the opponent at the defense. The thesis is about eHealth Innovations and consist on work related to two eHealth innovations: medical records online for patients & the service “My referrals”. Two papers are on medical records online for patients in her thesis.

Sofie Wass included five publications in her thesis and she has used an unusual variety of methods in her papers. You find 1) one literature study on open innovation and eHealth, 2) one interview study with experts and decision makers in health care, 3) one study on using business models for eHealth including interviews, a workshop and observations, and finally also 4) one study using interviews and 5) a survey to health care professionals and one to patients.

The thesis is well worth reading for those who are in the eHealth and innovations area. The introduction text includes an overview of eHealth in Sweden with some of the major milestones described around the progress of eHealth. Here one can read that the official work with strategic work in eHealth started as late as 2002, and that the coordination of eHealth in Sweden has been coordinated by different organizations throughout the years.

There are also some interesting facts found in the thesis such as, here presented randomly:

  • 70% of all eHealth projects fail to achieve their goals 🙁
  • There are few studies on eHealth and Open innovation: Only 18 papers were found in her literature study.
  • Test results is the feature in medical records online that is highest ranked as an additional feature to rank in Jönköping county
  • Professionals working in outpatient clinics were less positive towards medical records online for patients than those in primary care.

 

 

Visitors at the HTO group and IKEA Sightseeing

We have had Leysan Nurgalieva, Marta Larusdottir and Shweta Premadanan visiting the HTO group the last weeks. You find some blog posts about their work here and here.

Apart from excellent work with data collection such as interviews, we also did some planning of studies and funding applications. And we also had time for some social activities. One night we went out for dinner together with the HTO group, and we really had a nice evening. I still remember the mailing about James Bond afterwards that was hilarious.

We also did some brief sightseeing to get the cultural experience of Sweden. And what can be more Swedish than IKEA in combination with the traditional Swedish Christmas table?  After the full tour of IKEA, our guests had the opportunity to try the different herrings, sausages and other things they served at the IKEA Christmas table. And of course, some Swedish meatballs!

No Time for Dinosaurs

Sweden is “lagging ahead” when it comes to the digital transformation of public organisations. This was the opening message from Expertgruppen för digitala investeringar at a seminar on Agile Transformation. According to recent statistics Sweden is not a leader in the field, something the Swedish Government wishes to change. While we wait for a new authority for Digitalization a special committee has been formed to support public organisations in the transformation. Much of this is done behind the scenes, but there are also open dissemination of best practices. Today’s event was one such occasion.

Anna Eriksson from Lantmäteriet, The Swedish Mapping, Cadastral and Land Registration Authority (I didn’t know that) talked about how the authority were transforming their IT-organisation to embrace agile practices. This was very much done via leading by example. The change project itself was run in the spirit of agile, early adopters were allowed to experiment and yearly hackatons encouraged mixed teams with both IT-developers and business people.

Martin Johansson, CIO at SEB and member of the committe, shared SEB:s long and ongoing digital transformation. Martin’s take home message can be summarized as agile takes time. Working in a large organization with legacy systems as well an established organizational culture agile does not happen overnight. One factor contributing to this was the fact that SEB.s project portfolio contained so many running waterfall projects. These had to be finished before the agile transformation could start to deliver. The dinosaurs had to go, as he said. There were many interesting points in Martins account but one important one was the need to unite the business side and the IT side of the organization. While SEB certainly transformed their IT structure, the importance of this collaboration was emphasized a number of times in his presentation. Judging from our own research experience that seems to be true for a number of other organisations as well.

Why this urgency for going agile? Well, as Anders Nyström–who moderated the seminar–said, the strategic projects are in general to slow for politics. With an average length of 30+ months it is difficult to see the effects of political initiatives. Perhaps even more importantly, both Anna Eriksson and Martin Johansson represent large, well established organisations, nevertheless the disruptions on the market calls for agile responses. Otherwise they might turn out to be  the dinosaurs.

The only thing I missed was the opportunity to ask a second question. I would have been really interested to learn more about their view on the user.