First observation day, part 1: facilitating interactions

Last week, I had my first observation day at the Uppsala University Hospital, more specifically at the Department of Pediatric Surgery. After introducing myself to the nursing staff attending the morning briefing, I was invited to spend the next few hours in company of an operating nurse and an assistant nurse working in tandem in one of the department’s operation theatres. The purpose of this observation day was not to formally collect data for a study, but rather to familiarize myself a bit more with nurses’ work environment in preparation for the DISA project. This first experience as an observer has led me to reflect on different aspects related to being out on the field as a researcher. I thus thought that I would write a short series of blog posts to share those reflections with you. This first post within the series is dedicated to interactions between researcher and members of the “target population” – and how I feel that observation facilitates this kind of exchanges.

Throughout my observation day, what struck me the most was probably how easy it was to interact with the nurses present – how friendly and open they were to my being there, and how naturally exchanges and conversations took place, even at unexpected moments.  For instance, an anesthetic nurse told me about a problematic aspect of using multiple digital systems while quickly fetching a cup of tea in the personal lounge, and another nurse expressed how energy consuming the introduction of a new system was while passing me in the corridor. Coffee breaks and downtimes during operations (for example while waiting for lab test results) were opportunities for longer conversations with the operating nurse and the assistant nurse I was paired with. During those conversations, I was even able to ask specific questions about what I had seen or heard, which gave me a more accurate understanding of how nurses use and experience IT systems in their daily working life.

As such, I realized that a very significant advantage of being an observer was that I was making myself available to the department´s nurses on their own terms. While interviews typically require participants to come and talk to the interviewer at a specific time and during a pre-determined duration, observation lets them free to choose whether they want to interact with the researcher. If they are willing to do so, they can do it knowing that they are the ones choosing what the conversation is about and how long it lasts, being free to interrupt the discussion and resume their work at any moment. I felt that this was a sort of “win-win” situation for the nurses and I, as they had the possibility to tell me about the aspects of their work with digital systems that they felt were significant without additional stress or constraints while I was able to get an in-depth insight into their work and work environment.

In my next post, I will address another aspect of observation that I experienced as particularly positive: the immersion into the work environment.