Lecture on Digitalization and our Work Environment

 

System development work is difficult, and many IT systems do not work satisfactorily despite intensive technology development. My research is about improving the situation and understanding what the problems are. I am working on developing improved working methods in the organizations and projects that develop and introduce IT. The focus here is user-centered methods, gender, sociotechnical perspective and agile development. I have also researched the skills that the people in the projects need to master to be able to work with the development of complex systems that support people in a good way.

If you are curious about my research – listen to the 12 min long lecture in Swedish

 

A Seminar (in Swedish) on the Implementation of IT in Healthcare

Back in December I was invited to give a seminar in Swedish at the EPJ department of Region Uppsala, the department in charge of many of the health-related IT systems used at the hospitals and primary care facilities in the region. My seminar was on the the current state of research in relation to how to implement IT in healthcare. Out of all the perspectives one can use to approach this area of challenges for healthcare, I devoted most of the seminar to presenting barriers and enablers to change management projects as well as IT development projects, and discussing these with the participants. The seminar was recorded and is now available on YouTube, if you find the topic interesting (and are comfortable with the Swedish language).

The HTO group, and more generally the HCI group at the Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University, have an ongoing collaboration with the EPJ department at the region, and there will be more seminars on a variety of topics given by us during the spring.

Walkthrough of MetaVision and Orbit with two nurses from the Uppsala University Hospital

Paper-based forms for the daily documentation of a patient in the intensive care unit

With the DISA kick-off approaching, we have been working hard on acquiring the background knowledge necessary to getting the project started on the right track. In this context, Gerolf, Ida and I were given this week an exciting insight into the functionality and layout of two computerized systems that have recently been or will shortly be introduced at the Uppsala University Hospital, namely MetaVision and Orbit. MetaVision is a clinical information system intended to support patient monitoring in the intensive care unit and during operations. Its implementation started about one year and half ago and is now almost completed. Orbit, on the other hand, is an operation planning system whose implementation process will start at the end of the month at the Uppsala University Children’s Hospital.

Two nurses who have been actively involved in the implementation of, respectively, MetaVision and Orbit, kindly accepted to walk us through the main components of each system. In so doing, they also provided us with essential contextual information which enabled us to develop a more complete understanding of the current and upcoming situation at the University Hospital.

As I had never seen what a patient’s bedside looked like in the intensive care, I was impressed to see the number of devices connected to the patient. However, I was even more taken aback by the multitude of paper sheets that had to be filled in by nurses for each patient every day prior to the implementation of MetaVision. As the system now automatically gathers data from the different devices connected to the patient, the need for manual documentation is estimated to have been reduced of approximately 80%. The remaining 20% encompasses such information as the meals and drinks given to the patient, the activities related to personal hygiene provided by the nurses (hair washing, teeth brushing etc.), the patient’s position (back, right / left side) or the evaluation of the pupils.

In regard with operation planning, it is now handled by means of different physical folders containing waiting lists. Orbit is expected to replace those folders as well as to support the documentation of operations, where it would partly overlap with MetaVision’s functionality. However, as no integration of the two systems is possible at this point, the implementation of Orbit will require for nurses to enter twice certain pieces of information in order for patient data to be complete in both MetaVision and Orbit. This situation can be explained by the different origins behind the implementation of the two systems: MetaVision’s acquisition and implementation process was launched by the Uppsala University Hospital before the Uppsala County Council decided to have Orbit implemented as a measure to guarantee a safer operations planning.