Value-based care at the Uppsala University Hospital

Last Friday, Ida, Gerolf and I had a very instructive and thought-provoking meeting with one of the team members working on value-based care at the Uppsala University Hospital. The hospital is indeed in the process of optimizing its care-delivery processes in order to provide patients with both a better experience with hospital-based treatments and a higher quality of care. This relatively new, international “value-based” approach has its origins in the realization that hospital-based care processes lack efficiency and, from a patient perspective, objective ways to evaluate their quality. Statistics frequently used to assess the quality of the provided care include for example the number and the length of hospital visits, which the value-based approach argues are not actually representative of quality. More meaningful quality factors from a patient-centered perspective include for example how the patient feels, how quickly a diagnosis is established or whether the treatment is effective (whether the symptoms are effectively reduced by the treatment). As such, the value-based care optimization process aims to achieve quality in terms of patient-centered factors as well as provide valid measurements for the different factors taken into account, i.e. make it possible to evaluate the achieved quality level from a patient perspective. To carry out this high-level optimization process, the value-based care team at the Uppsala University Hospital is working together with inter-department groups of clinicians, for example in the form of workshops, in order to model the existing care flows and identify ways they can be improved as well as meaningful evaluation measurements.

Although those high-level organizational changes are beyond the scope of the DISA-project, it was important for us to get an insight into this change process currently taking place at the Uppsala University Hospital. Those workflow changes may indeed influence the documentation procedures (most of which are carried out digitally), and a good understanding of those procedures, their context and their purpose is essential in order to be able to interpret correctly what we will hear and observe while out in the field throughout the project.

Personally, I wonder whether a similar optimization could be applied to the doctors and nurses’ digital work environment. However, if patient-centered quality factors are relatively easy to come up with, the task is more complex when it comes to digital, nurse-centered processes. When it comes to computer-mediated documentation and, more generally, care delivery, what is quality? How can we assess and ensure that the existing digital workflows support nurses’ efficiency and well-being? I really hope that our work within the DISA-project will make it possible for us to answer those questions.